Grootegeluk Coal Mine, South Africa

9th June 2000 By: System Author

Grootegeluk Coal Mine Northern Province Name: Grootegeluk Coal Mine. Location: Close to Ellisras in the Northern Province Bushveld.

Brief description: Opencast mine in the Waterberg coalfield, with five beneficiation plants producing different grades of coal for the local and export markets.

Brief history: The mine was commissioned in 1981. During 1941 to 1952, the extent of the Waterberg coalfield was probed by means of geological mapping, 143 diamond-drill holes and two prospecting shafts. In 1957, Iscor acquired the surface rights on six farms. In 1973 Iscor started an intensive exploration programme on these farms for a final assessment of the reserves and quality of metallurgical coal on these properties. In 1975 a trial boxcut was established to obtain a bulk sample for beneficiation tests. A mining le ase on the original six farms was granted in 1979 and in 1980 Grootegeluk Coal Mine was established.

Products: Four main products are mined, including semi-soft coking coal and PCI coal for the local and export market, while power-generation coal is delivered to nearby Matimba power station.

In addition, sized metallurgical coal is produced for distribution to smaller consumers, ranging from tobacco farmers to brickworks.

Mining Method: Mining is by the conventional truck-and-shovel method, but extraction of the upper and middle Ecca differs. The upper Ecca is bulk-mined, whereas the middle Ecca zones are mined selectively. Geology: Although the Waterberg coalfield covers a relatively small surface area, it is one of South Africa’s most important coalfields in terms of on-site reserves.

The coalfield runs about 88 m from east to west and 40 km from north to south and continues westward into Botswana. It is fault-bounded along its northern and southern limits. The coal deposit forms part of the Ecca group and eleven coal-bearing zones can be distinguished. The coal seams mined at Grootegeluk form part of the upper and middle Ecca.

Reserves: Recoverable run-of-mine coal totals around six-billion tons.

Major infrastructure and equipment: The mine operates five beneficiation plants, fourteen 181-t rear dump-trucks, fourteen 200-t rear dump-trucks, a 255-t rear dump-truck, five rope shovels, four hydraulic shovels and three diesel-driven rotation drills.

Future prospects: With the vast coal reserves available, the mine is continuously striving to increase production. It has the potential to substantially increase supply to Matimba power station with limited capital investment. This will result in an increase in production of other products for the local and export markets.

Controlling company: Iscor. Unique features: The mine is the only coal-mining operation in the Waterberg, and produces from nine different benches.

Name: Grootegeluk Coal Mine. Location: Close to Ellisras in the Northern Province Bushveld.

Brief description: Opencast mine in the Waterberg coalfield, with five beneficiation plants producing different grades of coal for the local and export markets.

Brief history: The mine was commissioned in 1981. During 1941 to 1952, the extent of the Waterberg coalfield was probed by means of geological mapping, 143 diamond-drill holes and two prospecting shafts. In 1957, Iscor acquired the surface rights on six farms. In 1973 Iscor started an intensive exploration programme on these farms for a final assessment of the reserves and quality of metallurgical coal on these properties. In 1975 a trial boxcut was established to obtain a bulk sample for beneficiation tests. A mining lease on the original six farms was granted in 1979 and in 1980 Grootegeluk Coal Mine was established.

Products: Four main products are mined, including semi-soft coking coal and PCI coal for the local and export market, while power- generation coal is delivered to nearby Matimba power station.

In addition, sized metallurgical coal is produced for distribution to smaller consumers, ranging from tobacco farmers to brickworks.

Mining Method: Mining is by the conventional truck-and-shovel method, but extraction of the upper and middle Ecca differs. The upper Ecca is bulk-mined, whereas the middle Ecca zones are mined selectively. Geology: Although the Waterberg coalfield covers a relatively small surface area, it is one of South Africa’s most important coalfields in terms of on-site reserves.

The coalfield runs about 88 m from east to west and 40 km from north to south and continues westward into Botswana. It is fault-bounded along its northern and southern limits. The coal deposit forms part of the Ecca group and eleven coal-bearing zones can be distinguished. The coal seams mined at Grootegeluk form part of the upper and middle Ecca.

Reserves: Recoverable run-of-mine coal totals around six-billion tons.

Major infrastructure and equipment: The mine operates five beneficiation plants, fourteen 181-t rear dump-trucks, fourteen 200-t rear dump-trucks, a 255-t rear dump-truck, five rope shovels, four hydraulic shovels and three diesel-driven rotation drills.

Future prospects: With the vast coal reserves available, the mine is continuously striving to increase production. It has the potential to substantially increase supply to Matimba power station with limited capital investment. This will result in an increase in production of other products for the local and export markets.

Controlling company: Iscor. Unique features: The mine is the only coal-mining operation in the Waterberg, and produces from nine different benches.